Maps of the Month Archives

December 2009:
Impact of Emissions on Priority Development Areas

Posted by Gilbert Frausto | MTC GIS

According to the Bay Area Air Quality Management District, diesel particulate matter (DPM) at smaller sizes, e.g. 2.5 microns, can be extremely harmful in its effects on public health and might also have an impact on climate change. The source of DPM is diesel engines, which vary in use from haulage trucks to industrial power plants.

The map of the month shows the distribution of DPM emissions within the Bay area. The analysis shows that priority development areas along I-880 and in east San Francisco experience a high volume of DPM emissions compared to development areas north and south of the Bay.

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November 2009:
Daily Trips and Distance Traveled to Major Employment Centers

Posted by Kearey Smith | MTC GIS

The map of the month highlights the impact of combined housing and transportation costs on low-moderate income households in the Bay area. The income range for households in this classification is $35,000 to $60,000. These data were derived through a study conducted by the Center for Neighborhood Technology (CNT) in order to better understand variations in housing and transportation affordability at the neighborhood level. CNT recommends that combined housing and transportation costs not exceed 48% of a household’s income.

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OCTOBER 2009:
Express Bus Service Level on Regional Express Lanes

Posted by Gilbert Frausto | MTC GIS

The map of the month focuses on the variation in bus service along major freeways and highways within the Bay Area. By isolating bus route segments along major freeways, and adding up the number of daily trips along those segments, a general overview of the amount of bus transit service along the major freeways and highways was determined. The daily number of trips represents the aggregate total of all bus trips for all transit operators with service along each major freeway or highway segment. Among the most heavily served corridors, Interstate 880 Northbound between the San Jose Diridon Transit Center and the Fremont BART Station has approximately 30 trips per mile segment while I-80 has a daily average of 20 trips per mile segment in both directions between Fairfield Transit Center in Solano County, and El Cerrito Del Norte BART Station in Contra Costa County.

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JULY 2009:
Distribution of State Services in California

Posted by Gilbert Frausto | MTC GIS

The map of the month demonstrates that the statewide distribution of funding by county for state services in California is largely dependent on the revenue collected through income taxes. Counties whose residents pay higher income tax rates enable the state to fund services and programs in counties that generate less revenue for the state through income tax. This map shows this distribution based on funding data from FY 2007-2008. For the purposes of this analysis, state services include prison, parole, mental health, medical aid, K-12 education, in-home supportive services and separate state programs.

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JUNE 2009:
Shoreline Areas Vulnerable to Sea Level Rise: 2040 – 2060

Posted by Gilbert Frausto | MTC GIS

The map of the month depicts a report currently being prepared by the Bay Conservation and Development Commission (BCDC), “Living with a Rising Bay: Climate Change impacts on the San Francisco Bay and Adaptation Strategies.” The report highlights areas in the region vulnerable to sea level rise. The map of the month outlines the extent of the possible effects of sea level rise on existing and future transportation infrastructure by showing segments that exist or are being planned within vulnerable areas. Based upon this analysis, BCDC has found 671 miles of existing and 337 miles of future road, rail, air, and other infrastructure at risk of being affected by potential sea level rise.

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MAY 2009:
Unemployment in California

Posted by Gilbert Frausto | MTC GIS

The map of the month illustrates the dramatic shift in unemployment rates by county for the state of California. California’s unemployment rate was 10.5 percent in February 2009. One year ago, half of California's counties had unemployment rates below 8 percent; in February of this year, there are only four counties with an unemployment rate below 8% (Marin, San Mateo, Mono, and Orange County). The year-over-year change (February 2008 to February 2009) shows a decrease of 605,900 jobs statewide. The nine-county Bay Area unemployment rates are in the lower end of the current range. Santa Clara has the highest rate, 9.9%, and Marin has the lowest rate in the State, 6.8%.

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FEBRUARY 2009:
Shoreline Areas Vulnerable to Sea Level Rise: 2040-2060

Posted by Kearey Smith | MTC GIS

According to a report being prepared by the Bay Area Conservation and Development Commission ("Living with a Rising Bay: Climate Change Impacts on San Francisco Bay and Adaptation Strategies," available in 2009), the sea level in the Bay could rise a foot or more, inundating some communities and covering both the San Francisco and Oakland airports, state highways, and other key road and transit infrastructure.

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JANUARY 2009:
Population in Poverty

Posted by Gilbert Frausto | MTC GIS

The map of the month shows the share of the population living beneath 200% of the Federal poverty level, according to 2007 American Community Survey data. While the larger shares of poverty occur in rural counties, urban counties have the largest gross number of people in poverty. In a ranking of the top ten counties in California by total persons in poverty, Alameda and Santa Clara Counties rank eighth and ninth, respectively.

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DECEMBER 2008:
Jobs per Employed Resident by MPO

Posted by Gilbert Frausto | MTC GIS

The map of the month shows the balance of jobs to workers residing within the jurisdiction of a Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) and the nature of inter-regional commuting across California. The MPOs shown in red have job surpluses or more workers at work in the MPO than workers residing in the MPO. This results in net in-commuting from surrounding MPOs. The MPOs depicted in green have job deficits which result in net out-commuting to other MPOs.

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NOVEMBER 2008:
Proposition 1A Support

Posted by Gilbert Frausto | MTC GIS

The map of the month shows support for Proposition 1A, the Safe, Reliable, High-Speed Train Bond Act which passed with a 53% majority vote. This is a contiguous cartogram showing the total votes and the margin of votes for or against the proposition in the November, 2008 General Election by county. A contiguous cartogram is a transformation of a map where the original county areas are expanded or contracted to represent the total votes. The result is a distortion of the original county areas that maintains the relative position of the counties. More voters in the green counties supported Proposition 1A and, conversely, more voters in the orange/red counties opposed the proposition

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OCTOBER 2008:
Public Transit Footprint

Posted by Gilbert Frausto | MTC GIS

This month’s map depicts the transit service coverage for the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area using data from the 511.org Regional Transit Database. Alameda County is served by the largest number of transit services (10); followed by San Francisco and Contra Costa County (8); and Santa Clara County (6). This depiction clearly illustrates the challenge of transit coordination and connectivity among the region’s transit agencies.

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SEPTEMBER 2008:
TransLink® for TOD

Posted by Gilbert Frausto | MTC GIS

The TransLink® for TOD project launched this Summer, will serve as a "proof-of concept" about the viability of future arrangements with cities and developers to share the cost of subsidized transit passes for TOD residents and employees. The program has provided free personalized TransLink® cards with free passes on AC Transit to almost 1,500 residents of select transit oriented developments (TOD) in the cities of Berkeley, Oakland, El Cerrito, Emeryville, Alameda, San Leandro and Albany. These customers will provide valuable feedback about the program’s impact on transit ridership and the TransLink® technology, as well as provide travel pattern and usage data to support MTC’s ongoing TOD initiatives..

The map analyzes the size of each TOD location in terms of the number of housing units per apartment building or complex, in comparison with an index that measures the walkability and quality of bus transit service for that location. Walkability is from www.walkscore.com and is calculated based on the number of businesses, parks and other destinations within walking distance of a given location. The transit quality rating is based on the combined headways of all nearby AC Transit bus lines, the distance from the location to the nearest bus stop, and the quality of destinations served by the nearby bus lines. The walkability rating and the transit quality rating are combined to give an overall weighted walkability/transit quality index score.

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JULY 2008:
Traffic Collisions per Square Mile

Posted by Gilbert Frausto | MTC GIS

The map of the month depicts traffic collisions per square mile in 2006. The Statewide Integrated Traffic Records System (SWITRS) processes all reported fatal and injury collisions which occurred on California's state highways and all other roadways, excluding private property. During 2006, the Bay Area had over 89,000 traffic collisions of which 458 were fatal (up 4% from 2005), and 31,049 involved injuries (down 7% from 2005). Out of the 493 fatal collisions that occurred in the region, 119 pedestrians and 23 bicyclists were killed. The top three cities with a fatal collision involving a pedestrian were, not surprisingly, the three largest: San Jose (19), San Francisco (19), and Oakland (14).

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JUNE 2008:
Carbon Emissions per Capita in 2005

Posted by Gilbert Frausto | MTC GIS

According to the Metropolitan Policy Program at the Brookings Institution, some of the largest metropolitan areas had among the lowest carbon emissions per capita from transportation and residential energy use in 2005. However, metropolitan carbon footprints vary widely, based on determining factors such as population density, the availability of public transit, the carbon intensity of electricity generation, the price of electricity and the weather, as shown on the map.

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MAY 2008:
Goods Movement Land Use

Posted by Gilbert Frausto | MTC GIS

This map depicts goods movement related land uses that are at risk of conversion to a non-goods movement supporting land use. The data is based upon the Goods Movement Land Use Study, which examines planned land use changes in several key corridors that support goods movement in the nine-county San Francisco Bay region. This map indicates, that within the Goods Movement Study corridors, about 116,000 acres of goods movement related land uses are a risk of conversion to a non-goods movement related land use.

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APRIL 2008:
Projected Transit-Using Households in 2035

Posted by Gilbert Frausto | MTC GIS

This map depicts the projected share of transit-using households by travel analysis zone in the year 2035. Transit-using households are estimated using Bay Area travel survey data, where persons are reporting one-or-more transit trips on a selected weekday. The total number of transit-using households in the region is projected to be 24% in 2035, or 804,500 out of 3,292,500 total households. San Francisco has the highest share of transit-using households, at 55%, while Alameda County has the highest total number of transit-using households, at 244,100 (35% of total households in the county).

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MARCH 2008:
Half-Cent Self-Help County Sales Tax Expenditures by Mode

Posted by Gilbert Frausto | MTC GIS

This map depicts several county-wide self-help sales tax measures in the Bay Area and in two surrounding counties. Expenditures are categorized by four spending groups based on mode of travel:

  1. Public transit, including both fixed routes and paratransit;

  2. Highway and street improvements;

  3. Local streets and roads, rehabilitation; and

  4. Miscellaneous, including all other projects such as Transportation for Livable Communities, Pedestrian and Bicycle, Safe Routes to School, etc.

The surrounding counties of San Joaquin and Sacramento are included for reference and comparison purposes, although they are not within MTC’s jurisdiction.

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FEBRUARY 2008:
Drive Time to nearest Employment Center

Posted by Gilbert Frausto | MTC GIS

This map depicts the morning peak period commute shed for major employment centers within the nine county Bay Area. MTC’s analysis of the 2006 employment statistics, as reported by the Employment Development Department (EDD), indicates that there are approximately 1,648,000 employees working in or near a major bay area employment center. These areas represent approximately 47% of the region’s total employment. Within this morning peak period commute shed, there are approximately 5.6 million people that live within 15 minutes driving time of one of the 38 major employment centers. There are an additional 644,000 that live within 30 minutes of an employment center, and another 458,000 live within the 30-60 minute commute shed.

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NOVEMBER 2007:
Northern California Megaregion

Posted by Gilbert Frausto | MTC GIS

The map of the month was published recently by the San Francisco Planning and Urban Research (SPUR) organization, and it shows the greater Bay Area “megaregion” that now extends beyond the traditional nine counties that touch San Francisco Bay.

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OCTOBER 2007:
FOCUS Priority Development Areas

Posted by Gilbert Frausto | MTC GIS

The region’s Smart Growth Vision calls for the Bay Area to develop as a “network of neighborhoods,” where future growth is concentrated near transit and in the existing communities that surround the San Francisco Bay. This month’s map shows the network of Proposed Priority Development Areas (PDAs) throughout the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area. The areas around transit stations and along major developed corridors are two examples of where the region’s smart-growth vision would prefer to see new housing development. Led by ABAG, the regional agencies are currently meeting with our local partners to discuss the details of PDA agreements regarding development intensities and objectives, identify local jurisdictions willing to implement these agreements, and locate the parts of the region meriting incentives and other special assistance to achieve the desired level of development.

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SEPTEMBER 2007:
Urban Growth From 1984 to 2004

Posted by Gilbert Frausto | MTC GIS

The September map illustrates the change in the amount of developed land from 1984 to 2004 within the San Francisco Bay Area. The map also contains a chart with similar information for other metropolitan planning organizations (MPOs) in California. The Southern California Association of Governments has the largest land area of any MPO in the state, and has also seen the largest amount of growth. However, the percentage growth in the Los Angeles region was lower than either the Bay Area or the San Diego region over the two-decade time period.

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JULY 2007:
Regional Employment Center Characteristics

Posted by Gilbert Frausto | MTC GIS

This month’s map depicts the distribution of employment by sector within the employment centers of the San Francisco Bay Area. Employment centers are defined using the number of jobs per square mile; areas with greater than 5,000 jobs per square mile are generally considered to be employment centers. The six employment sectors are those used in ABAG’s Projections 2007, and are defined using North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) codes. The data comes from the California Employment Development Department (EDD), and describes the number of full-time and part-time jobs for which employers pay workers wages or salaries. This employment data excludes business owners, self-employed persons, unpaid volunteers, family workers and private household workers.

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MAY 2007:
2006 Carbon Dioxide Emissions

Posted by Gilbert Frausto | MTC GIS

This month’s map highlights the effects of urban density on the amount of carbon dioxide (CO²) emissions per household. As you can see from the map of the Bay Area, lower per capita CO² emissions generally appear in the most densely populated parts of the region due to households in those communities driving less and shorter distances compared to households in more suburban or rural areas.

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APRIL 2007:
America 2050: 10 Emerging Mega Regions

Posted by Gilbert Frausto | MTC GIS

The map this month depicts the emerging concept of treating the San Francisco Bay Area and other large U.S. metropolitan areas as “mega-regions”. The ten mega-regions shown on the map account for 68% of the nation’s population, 78% of U.S. gross domestic product, and over 90% of the traffic congestion and air pollution besetting the nation’s residents.

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MARCH 2007:
Jobs/Housing Imbalances

Posted by Gilbert Frausto | MTC GIS

The map this month depicts the ratio of total trips by origin Travel Analysis Zone (TAZ) to destination TAZ, based upon the Projections 2005 forecast for the year 2030. The green areas on this map depict locations where there is a higher number of residential land uses than employment land uses, thus creating more trips produced than trips attracted. The red areas on this map depict locations where there is a higher number of employment land uses, which produce more trips attracted than trips produced. We use this information to analyze the travel characteristics of the region’s residents, as well as to better understand the impacts of Jobs/Housing mismatch on the region’s transportation infrastructure.

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FEBRUARY 2007:
Goods Movement Land Uses

Posted by Gilbert Frausto | MTC GIS

Goods movement industries play an important role in the region’s economy. However, they are under significant pressure from land use development trends, which pose a number of potential problems including increased land use conflicts, increased truck travel and tail pipe emissions, and higher costs of goods distribution. The map depicts one of several key goods movement corridors where MTC has identified and mapped existing industrial lands that are used for goods movement related activities. The Oakland corridor is approximately 9,159 acres in size, with about 6,000 acres devoted to existing goods movement related land uses. After examining local planned land use designations for this area, we estimate that about 1,500 acres, or 25 percent of the current goods movement land uses, are “at risk” of being converted to non-goods movement related land uses.

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DECEMBER 2006:
SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE SEISMIC SAFETY PROJECT: Key Fabricators and Suppliers

Posted by Gilbert Frausto | MTC GIS

This map depicts the locations worldwide where the various components that will be used to construct the Self-Anchored Suspension (SAS) Span are being fabricated. They will slowly begin to appear on-site later in 2007, with individual bridge deck sections coming into place beginning in 2009. Simultaneously, a considerable amount of work will be occurring on the Yerba Buena Island tunnel interface, as well as at the Oakland touchdown. When complete, the SAS will be the longest single tower, self-anchored suspension bridge in the world, and is expected to be fully open to traffic in 2013.

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OCTOBER 2006:
Bay Area Pavement Quality 2005

Posted by Gilbert Frausto | MTC GIS

This month's map depicts average Bay Area local road pavement quality, a subject which received considerable press attention last week following a press conference that featured Commissioners Beall and McLemore releasing the latest MTC pavement condition report. As you can see, average pavement conditions are poorer in the North Bay, which in part probably reflects the lack of a dedicated local transportation sales tax in two of our four northern counties.

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SEPTEMBER 2006:
CHANGE IN TOTAL RESIDENT WORKERS 2000 - 2005: Census 2000 and American Community Survey 2005

Posted by Gilbert Frausto | MTC GIS

This month's map illustrates the change in total resident workers between 2000 and 2005 according to the U.S. Census Bureau. The Bay Area lost over 121 thousand resident commuters between 2000 and 2005, a 3.7 percent decrease. The Richmond District in San Francisco lost over 13 thousand resident workers between 2000 and 2005, from 76,400 to 63,030 -- a 17.5% drop. This was the highest drop of resident workers in the region. East Contra Costa County (Brentwood/Byron) had the highest increase in resident workers, gaining over 9,600 resident workers between 2000 and 2005. This area grew from 49,890 in 2000 to 59,560 in 2005 — a 19.4% increase.

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JULY 2006:
TOTAL COLLISIONS INVOLVING BICYCLES OR PEDESTRIANS: Total Reported Collisions Involving Bicycles or Pedestrians. Includes Fatalities. By City/County, 1997 through 2004

Posted by Gilbert Frausto | MTC GIS

This month's map depicts collisions involving bicycles or pedestrians, and any resulting fatalities, from 1997 through 2004. The source data was reported by the CHP State-Wide Integrated Traffic Records System for every city in the nine-county Bay Area, including totals for the unincorporated portion of each county. From 1997 through 2004, there were 46,819 total collisions involving bicycles or pedestrians in the Bay Area. Of these, there were 1,076 fatalities, including 166 bicyclists. This is an average of 154 total fatalities a year, including 24 bicyclists.

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JUNE 2006:
REGIONAL TRANSIT COVERAGE: Transit Stop Density Within a Half-Mile Radius

Posted by Gilbert Frausto | MTC GIS

This month's map illustrates public transit service coverage in the Bay Area based upon the number of bus, rail, and ferry stops within one-half mile. As you might expect, the greatest density of service is clustered in downtown San Francisco where there are more than 180 transit stops within one-half mile of the central business district.

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MAY 2006:
USA NATIONAL GAS TEMPERATURE MAP: Gas Prices by County as of May 23, 2006

Posted by Gilbert Frausto | MTC GIS

This month's map represents a bit of a departure, since it is not specific to the Bay Area. I thought the commission might be interested, however, in a map I discovered on the Internet that depicts current gasoline pump prices by county throughout the United States. As you are already painfully aware, California has the highest gas prices in the nation. If you don't mind driving a fair distance to fill up your tank, the lowest prices appear to be in Wyoming.

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APRIL 2006:
URBANIZED AREAS MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 2000

Posted by Gilbert Frausto | MTC GIS

The map of the month depicts median household income in our nine-county region. The map shows both low and high-income communities spread throughout the Bay Area — although many low-income neighborhoods are concentrated in the inner East Bay.

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MARCH 2006:
DAILY (WEEKDAY) VEHICLE HOURS OF DELAY: Morning and Evening Commutes

Posted by Gilbert Frausto | MTC GIS

This month's map is a re-do of the last month's depiction of the most congested freeway locations in 2004. As noted by Commissioner Haggerty, last month's map contained a few inaccuracies that have been corrected.

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FEBRUARY 2006:
DAILY (WEEKDAY) VEHICLE HOURS OF DELAY: Morning and Evening Commutes

Posted by Gilbert Frausto | MTC GIS

We are all used to the annual ritual of releasing the "top ten" most congested freeway segments in the Bay Area. The Map of the Month goes beyond the "top ten" list to depict all of the major congested freeway segments in the region by degree of severity. As you can plainly see, the I-80 approach to the Bay Bridge is in a class by itself.

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JANURARY 2006:
COMMUTER RAIL RIGHT OF WAY: Bay Area Railroad R.O.W. Corridors

Posted by Gilbert Frausto | MTC GIS

This month's featured map (see Attachment 6) depicts the commuter rail right-of-way (ROW) network in the Bay Area and shows ROW owned by public agencies as well as leased from private railroads for public use. The map also shows privately owned ROW that may shortly be purchased by public agencies to run the proposed eBART service in Contra Costa County and the restored Dumbarton rail service in the South Bay.

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DECEMBER 2005:
Racial Diversity and Transit Expansion

Posted by Gilbert Frausto | MTC GIS

This map depicts racial diversity in the San Francisco Bay Area in 2000 with an overlay showing major transit expansion projects according to the MTC Resolution 3434 Transit Expansion Program. Racial diversity is measured by a diversity index that is calculated using US Census racial and ethnic population characteristics from the PL-94 data file. The diversity index is based on five racial/ethnic groups: Hispanic/Latino, white (not Hispanic/Latino), black (not Hispanic/ Latino), Asian or Pacific Islander (not Hispanic/Latino), and other races (American Indian, Alaska Native, some other race, or two or more races). An index value was calculated for each Census Block Group that ranges on a continuous scale from no diversity (one group has a 100% share of the population) to total diversity (all five groups have equal share of the population).

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NOVEMBER 2005:
Cumulative Freeway Patrol Incidents 2002-05

Posted by Gilbert Frausto | MTC GIS

This map depicts the volume of traffic incidents handled by our Freeway Service Patrol tow trucks. The more heavily traveled routes have more incidents – although the Peninsula freeways appear to fare better than those in the East Bay.

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OCTOBER 2005:
Half-Cent Self-Help County Sales Tax Expenditure By Category

Posted by Gilbert Frausto | MTC GIS

This map depicts the volume of traffic incidents handled by our Freeway Service Patrol tow trucks. The more heavily traveled routes have more incidents – although the Peninsula freeways appear to fare better than those in the East Bay.

  1. Public Transit, including both fixed routes and paratransit

  2. Highways and Streets

  3. Local streets and roads, including the allocation to local jurisdictions

  4. Miscellaneous, including all other projects such as Transportation for Livable Communities, Pedestrian and Bicycle, Safe Routes to School, etc.

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SEPTEMBER 2005:
21 Bay Area Regional Transit Hubs

Posted by Gilbert Frausto | MTC GIS

The Regional Transit Connectivity Map illustrates the network of transit hubs identified through the Regional Transit Connectivity Study currently underway. The purpose of the study is to identify barriers that may impede the transit experience of persons using more than one transit operator for a single trip, and to recommend strategies to address those gaps. As a first step, project participants identified a regional network of 21 transit hubs--those places where most transfers between operators occur. The consultant team then selected five “prototype” hubs for a comprehensive on-site evaluation as a basis for developing recommended improvements in customer information, schedule coordination, hub amenities, improved shuttle or other “last mile” services, and way finding signage.

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JUNE 2005:
511 Driving Times Freeway Coverage

Posted by Gilbert Frausto | MTC GIS

This map shows the phased roll-out for the “driving times” feature of the 511 traveler information system. The third phase will be in place by November 2005 when the region hosts the ITS World Congress in San Francisco.

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JUNE 2005:
Transit Commuting in the U.S.

Posted by Gilbert Frausto | MTC GIS

This map shows the change in the market share of transit commuters for the 36 largest metropolitan areas from the 1990 to 2000 Census. There were sizable losses of transit market share in several East Coast and Midwestern regions, as well as gains in New England and West Coast locales. The San Francisco Bay Area had the 3 rd largest gain in transit commuting of all the areas.

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