Maps of the Month

DECEMBER 2014:
2013 Pavement Condition Index

Posted by Stella Wotherspoon | MTC GIS

This map visualizes the 2013 pavement condition for local streets within each jurisdiction in the San Francisco Bay Area, as retrieved from MTC’s StreetSaver® database. Pavement condition is represented by the Pavement Condition Index, which was developed by the US Army Corps of Engineers, ranges from a like-new condition of 100 to a failed condition of 0. The average PCI in the San Francisco Bay Area is 66. Pavement deterioration is primarily caused by distress from vehicle weight and aggravated by weather conditions.

Local funding priorities also play a significant role in the condition of a road network. As an example, El Cerrito recently passed a “self-help” tax specifically for road and pavement preservation. As a result, nearly all of the road segments within the city limits are either in Excellent or Very Good Condition. In other areas, targeted improvements can stretch limited funds. The cities of Orinda recently passed funding measures for their street network and started by focusing on arterial streets. This ensures that although their very low traffic volume local roads have not been restored, nearly everyone in the community is able to immediately see benefits from their funding choice.

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OCTOBER 2014:
BAY AREA SUBURBANIZATION OF POVERTY, 2000 to 2012

Posted by Stella Wotherspoon | MTC GIS

This map shows, by county-based place types, the percentage change in the population living below 100% of the Federal poverty level. Place types were defined by grouping US Census Designated Places as Central Cities, Inner Suburbs, Outer Suburbs, and Balance of Counties, based on their population, employment and travel characteristics. Viewed regionally, the percentage increase in poverty was highest in the Outer Suburbs (62% regional average), as compared to the Central Cities (22% regional average) and Inner Suburbs (24% regional average) showing a pattern of larger increases in poverty in the Region’s periphery. The percentage increases in poverty in the Outer Suburbs by County range from 38% to 89%, as compared to the Inner Suburbs which range from 17% to 30% and Central Cities from 3% to 40%.

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SEPTEMBER 2014:
CALIFORNIAN'S: WHERE WE CAME FROM AND WHERE WE WENT

Posted by Stella Wotherspoon | MTC GIS

For several years, foreign immigration has been a hot topic in our political debate. However, the movement of people from one state to another can have an even bigger influence on our country’s economy, politics and culture than immigration. These two charts depict where California residents were born, and where they have moved to. The ribbons are color-coded by region, and foreign-born residents are included at the bottom, in gray, to complete the picture for each state.

We know that California has long been the destination of American dreamers from other states. These days, California no longer plays that role. Our residents are leaving for greener pastures out East. Today, the state is still pulling in foreign immigrants, but the percentage of American-born transplants has shrunk significantly as fewer people move into the state. In 1960, half of California residents were born in another U.S. state. Today, that's down to 18 percent.

There are growing pools of Californians in nearly every state. It's quite a switch because through 1990 California led the nation in retaining its native-born population. There are now about 6.8 million California natives living elsewhere, up from 2.7 million in 1980.

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JULY 2014:
DID YOU FEEL THAT?

Posted by Stella Wotherspoon | MTC GIS

The U.S. Geological Survey has recently released new earthquake hazard maps for the nation, expanding seismic risk areas in California and along the East Coast. As in past estimates, the threat of earthquakes is highest along the West Coast, the Intermountain West -- that region between the Rocky Mountains and the Cascade Range -- and several areas in the central and eastern United States. According to the report, the 16 states with the highest risk include Alaska, Arkansas, California, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, Washington and Wyoming.

In California, the discovery of new faults raised hazard estimates for San Jose, Vallejo and San Diego. However, due to new understanding of earthquake fault processes, researchers downgraded threat estimates for Irvine, Santa Barbara and Oakland.

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June 2014:
TOP 10 FASTEST GROWING CITIES IN CALIFORNIA

Posted by Stella Wotherspoon | MTC GIS

According to population estimates recently released by the California Dept. of Housing and Community Development, the San Francisco Bay Area is the fastest growing region in the state. San Jose, followed by San Francisco and Oakland have the highest populations in the region, and three bay area cities made the top 10 ranking. In addition, our region also has 4 counties; Santa Clara (1), Alameda (2), San Francisco (5) and San Mateo (9), in the top 10 fastest growing counties.

Dublin (3), Campbell(7) and Rio Vista (8) each had a significant percentage change in their population growth. The state data reports population and housing trends for 482 California cities. Last year, all but 43 cities saw an increase in residents, with the declines typically experienced in the state’s rural areas.

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May 2014:
HOUSING UNITS PERCENT GROWTH IN 2013

Posted by Stella Wotherspoon | MTC GIS

On May 1, 2014, the California Department of Finance (DOF) released city, county, and state population estimates updated through the end of year 2013, which includes detailed data on housing production for the San Francisco Bay Area. This map depGicts housing production performance in the San Francisco Bay Area in year 2013 for counties, subareas, and cities. Key conclusions from the map are summarized below:

  • San Jose and San Francisco are acting as regional powerhouses for infill housing in the urban core.

  • Exurban development is alive and well in the Bay Area, even while housing development has continued to stall in neighboring San Joaquin County.

  • Cities along inner East Bay BART corridors produced little-to-no housing in 2013, while the Tri-Valley and eBART corridors saw robust growth.

  • After San Jose and San Francisco, suburban communities like Dublin, Campbell, and Fremont were the top generators of new housing units in 2013

  • Based on housing production rates (% growth), the fastest-growing cities in the region were all in the eastern fringe of the region or in booming Silicon Valley.

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April 2014:
Two Very Different Types of Migrations Are Driving Growth in U.S. Cities

Posted by Stella Wotherspoon | MTC GIS

According to figures recently released by the U.S. Census, America’s largest metro areas are currently gaining population at impressive rates. The growth in these areas is in fact driving much of the population growth across the nation. Upon closer examination of the data, this growth is the result of two very different migrations – one coming from the location choices of Americans themselves, the other shaped by where new immigrants from outside the United States are heading.


While many metro areas are attracting a net-inflow of migrants from other parts of the country, in several of the largest metros – New York, L.A., and Miami, especially – there is actually a net outflow of Americans to the rest of the country. Immigration is driving population growth in these places. Sunbelt metros like Houston, Dallas, and Phoenix, and knowledge hubs like Austin, Seattle, San Francisco, and D.C. are gaining much more from domestic migration.


This map charts overall or net migration – a combination of domestic and international migration. Most large metros, those with at least a million residents, had more people coming in than leaving. The metros with the highest levels of population growth due to migration are a mix of knowledge-based economies and Sunbelt metros, including Houston, Dallas, Miami, D.C., San Francisco, Seattle, and Austin. Eleven large metros, nearly all in or near the Rustbelt, had a net outflow of migrants, including Chicago, Detroit, Memphis, Philadelphia, and St. Louis.


From Atlantic Cities

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March 2014:
Best Selling Car in Every State

Posted by Kearey Smith | MTC GIS

The auto industry has become so globalized, you can find the same Ford in Detroit and in Beijing. So it's not surprising that Americans' taste in passenger vehicles has become a bit homogenized. To find how much difference there is in Americans car-buying habits, Business Insider conducted a survey using data obtained from Kelley Blue Book to find the best-selling car in each state. Sales data was selected from January thru August 2013, and the results were surprising.


Perhaps not surprisingly, the Ford F-Series family of trucks dominated the list, coming in at number one in more than 30 states. But Americans elsewhere have different tastes: California prefers the Honda Civic, while Florida and Maryland went for the Toyota Camry. Hawaii liked the Toyota Tacoma. Oklahoma bucked the geographic trend — the most popular car there is the Nissan Altima sedan.

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February 2014:
Sea Level Rise Projections for California, Oregon and Washington

Posted by Kearey Smith | MTC GIS

This map illustrates the total regional sea level projected for the years 2030, 2050, and 2100, relative to year 2000, for a transect along the west coast. The shape of the curve is dominated by the change in vertical land motion at about 40 degrees latitude from uplift in the north to subsidence in the south. The sea-level fingerprint effect reduces the projected sea levels along the entire coast and is most pronounced in Washington.


Projected sea-level rise off California, Oregon, and Washington for 2030 (blue), 2050 (green), and 2100 (pink), relative to 2000, as a function of latitude. Solid lines are the projections and shaded areas are the ranges. Ranges overlap, as indicated by the brown shading (low end of 2100 range and high end of 2050 range) and blue-green shading (low end of 2050 range and high end of 2030 range). MTJ = Mendocino Triple Junction, where the San Andreas Fault meets the Cascadia Subduction Zone.

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